Atlantic Records Supposedly Calls Albums "Mixtapes" To Avoid The Payment Of Producers

HipHop News Posted on January 4, 2018 at 8:30am

Atlantic Records Supposedly Calls Albums "Mixtapes" To Avoid The Payment Of Producers

"Anything to save a buck."

Atlantic Records is under fire for not adequately compensating the producers.

In a recent interview with DJ Pain 1 through BeatStars, E. Dan of Pittsburgh's production team ID Labs brought up that the Atlantic — in his experience — the launch of projects such as mixtapes or street albums as a way to avoid paying him his costs of production.

The point was specifically made when he was discussing his work on the Snow Product Good Nights And Bad Mornings 2: The Hangover.

"They don't treat it like an album, that was their way of not paying me much," E. Dan said with a laugh.

.@WizKhalifa producer E. Dan (@IdlabsMusic) explains how to record labels to avoid paying the producers of + how Wiz' loyalty got him beat placements 💯

Exclusive interview with @DJPain1 + @BeatStars 🙌🏽 pic.twitter.com/qAgm430dE5

— BeatStars (@BeatStars) January 2, 2018

He also spoke about how Wiz Khalifa of the Khalifa project was handled in a similar way.

"I don't remember if it's called a street album ... they had some clever name that meant I was paid half of what I normally do," he said. "Anything to save a buck these labels."

Have contributed to the formation of the musical careers of artists from acts like both Khalifa and Mac Miller from his artistic creation, this situation seems especially poignant.

The producers of Marvel Alexander and Snugsworth -- the producers behind a$AP Ferg's hit record "Shabba" — said the DJ Booth, about a situation similar to the one you had with RCA Records, which dropped the song before you sign an official contract. The label later forced to accept a much lower rate of $500, to be exact — referring to Ferg's album as a mixtape.

Not surprisingly, producer Sonny Digital, intervened in the situation — which was first reported by the DJ Booth — pointing out that if we're going to point the finger at the Atlantic, we must also recognize the most widespread of irregularities in

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